Will Aid

Half of Britons have no Will it's revealed, as Will Aid launches it's 2016 campaignHalf of Britons have no Will it's revealed, as Will Aid launches it's 2016 campaign

Half of Britons have not made a will, meaning they have no say in who their assets will be passed on to when they die, new figures have revealed.

The statistics have been compiled as part of a poll by charitable initiative Will Aid, to tie in with the launch of the organisation’s 2016 publicity drive My Last Words.

It found that while young people are the least likely to have made a will, an incredible 19% of people aged 55 and over haven’t either. It also discovered that 35% of people with no will have dependent children and therefore have not assigned guardians for them.

Will Aid Month, which takes place every November, encourages people to complete this vital piece of paperwork and tick it off the to-do list – as well as a chance to raise much needed funds for charity.

Will Aid partners with law firms who pledge their time to write basic wills, with clients invited to donate the fee to nine charities supported by Will Aid instead.

Peter de Vena Franks, campaign director, said: “A will tells your loved ones who should have your money, property and possessions when you die and who will be in charge of following your instructions - your executor.

“Without this information, the law decides how your estate is passed on – and this may not be in line with your wishes.

“Will Aid makes it easy for you to get a professional will drawn up with a solicitor as well as the opportunity to help nine fantastic charities who work with vulnerable people all over the world.”

The recommended donation for your basic Will Aid will is £95 for a single will and £150 for a pair of mirror wills.

Those who wish to make a will can make their November appointments from today – September 5th.

Will Aid patron, Dame Judi Dench, said: “These days, families can be complicated and it's more important than ever that you have a proper will to make sure all your loved ones are protected. It is also very important to review your will every few years. Family circumstances change, people grow older and the rules relating to inheritance change. The charity will-writing scheme, Will Aid provides the perfect opportunity to make or update your will and give to charity at the same time.”

Last year Will Aid raised more than £1 million for its charity partners – ActionAid, Age UK, British Red Cross, Christian Aid, NSPCC, Save the Children, Sightsavers, SCIAF (Scotland) and Trocaire (Northern Ireland).

The campaign has raised more than £17 million in donations since it started.

This year’s publicity drive - My Last Words – invites people to post their “last words” online accompanied by the hashtag #MyLastWords to encourage people to open up channels of communication on what can be a very emotive subject.

Solicitors can still sign up to take part. Contact Will Aid today to find out more or book an appointment. Visit www.willaid.org.uk

 

ENDS

 

 

EXTRA INFORMATION

 

Quirky wills

  • Once he’d popped… Pringles founder, Fred Baur requested to be cremated and buried inside a Pringles can.
  • Out of this world.  Star Trek creator, Gene Roddenberry asked for his ashes be scattered in space.
  • The longest known will was made by Mrs Frederica Cook. It contained 95,940 words, bound in four volume.
  • The shortest ever will was made by a man who simply put “all for mother”. 
  • Portuguese aristocrat Luis Carlos de Noronha Cabral da Camara made 70 strangers picked from a phone book his sole beneficiaries.
  • Harry Houdini insisted in his will that his wife hold an annual séance so he could reveal himself to her. Houdini left his wife a secret note with 10 randomly selected words that he would communicate to her after his death. For 10 years his wife held a séance on Halloween; Houdini never turned up.

 

Celebrities who left no will

  • Jimi Hendrix
    Although Jimi Hendrix died in 1970, the battle over his estate raged on for more than 30 years because he left no will regarding distribution of his estate. 
  • Bob Marley
    Bob Marley died intestate even though he knew he had cancer and lingered for nearly 8 months. His estate, worth a reported $30 million, had dozens of claimants.
  • Pablo Picasso
    Pablo Picasso died in 1973 at the age of 91, leaving behind a fortune in assets that included artwork, five homes, cash, gold and bonds. Because Picasso died intestate, it took six years to settle his estate at a cost of $30 million. His assets were eventually divided up among six heirs.
  • Amy Winehouse
    The singer died without a will and her parents inherited all of her fortune, leaving her ex-husband Blake Fielder-Civil with nothing.
  • Prince
    Prince died without a will last year meaning that his fortune—estimated at $150 to 300 million—will be distributed among his siblings.

 

Did you know?

  • It is a common misconception that if you die intestate – in other words without making any will – then your closest relatives will decide how assets are split. This is not the case. There are rigid rules as to who inherits when you die without a will, and in some cases this will simply mean the Government collects the lot.
  • Many unmarried couples, who have cohabited for years, may assume there is no need for a will as they are common law husband and wife. No such terms exist in estate law – and a partner can be disinherited by children, siblings, or even an uncle and aunt unless you have made adequate provision for them in a will.

 

Will Aid facts

 

  • You can make a November appointment with a participating Will Aid solicitor from September 5th.
  • Will Aid is held throughout November and is a UK-wide fundraising campaign involving nine of the UK’s leading charities that share the proceeds: ActionAid, Age UK, British Red Cross, Christian Aid, NSPCC, Save the Children, Sightsavers, SCIAF (Scotland) and Trocaire (N. Ireland).
  • The recommended donation for your basic Will Aid will is £95 for a single will and £150 for a pair of mirror wills.
  • Since Will Aid started in 1988, more than 300,000 people have made a will through the scheme and got the peace of mind that comes from protecting their loved ones for the future.
  • Will Aid is the most successful charity will-writing scheme in the UK, open to all adults. 
  • The campaign has raised more than £17 million in donations since it started. 

 

For more information about Will Aid visit the website at www.willaid.org.uk 

 

For more information, photographs, quotes or localised statistics please contact the Will Aid press team on [email protected] or call 01473 276127

Notes for Editors

 

  • November is Will Aid’s annual UK-wide fundraising campaign involving nine of the UK’s leading charities that share the proceeds: ActionAid, Age UK, British Red Cross, Christian Aid, NSPCC, Save the Children, Sightsavers, SCIAF (Scotland) and Trocaire (N. Ireland).
  • Will Aid has been running since 1988 and has run every November since 2008. It is the most successful charity Will-writing scheme in the UK, open to all adults. The campaign has encouraged 245,000 people to write their will with a qualified, regulated and insured solicitor and in so doing has raised over £17 million in donations. The recommended donation is £95 for a single will and £150 for a pair of mirror wills.
  • For more information on the Will Aid research or a digital version of this press release, visit http://www.willaid.org.uk/press
Will Aid 2016
Will Aid 2016